[trigger warning: purposeful misgendering]

ladyatheist:

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

ida-b-wells-b-whippin-yo-ass:

thetart:

libertarians-and-stoya:

So I’m being told I’m misgendering an ftm person because I don’t use their preferred pronoun which is them/they. That’s bad grammar and as a grammar nazi I’m getting pissed off.

Hey, asshole? Check yourself.

It looks like someone doesn’t care much about grammar, being a decent person, or making a turkey of themselves for the entire internet.

Tart.

For.

The.

Win.

oop

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meowgon:

i’ve said it before and i’ll say it again:

naoto really seemed like a trans narrative (especially during the shadow fight) with an uncertain ftm kid who wasn’t sure about his identity because of the circumstances in his life kind of pushing him into performing one particular way.

and then atlus was like WHOOPS NO LOL THAT WOULD BE ~TOO EDGY~ NAOTO WAS A GIRL ALL ALONG WHO WAS JUST A BIT UNCERTAIN AND WAS FORCED TO CROSSDRESS!  and now TEEHEE SHE’S GOT LONG HAIR AND DOESN’T BIND ANYMORE SHE’S A REAL GIRL!

and if you think i should be satisfied by that narrative, i want to ask you why?  when it’s seriously been done a million goddamn times before do i need to pull out examples because i can

In November of last year, while awaiting trial, CeCe wrote:
I am truly sorry for the loss of a person who also was involved in the incident, but how would my mom and family feel if she heard that I was killed by a group of racist, homophobic/transphobic people only for walking to the store and being at the wrong place at the wrong time, which luckily I wasn’t by myself. Or even looking at it in different aspects, would the situation have been the same? Would they have taken the same lengths to prosecute him if he had killed me? Or would they have even cared if it were a black on black crime?
Given the magnitude of the violence perpetrated against transgender women of color, CeCe’s question demands a thoughtful answer. Had CeCe been alone, it’s entirely possible that she might not have survived this encounter; as it is, she has pled guilty to a crime in spite of her assertions that she was acting in self-defense, and will serve time simply because she managed to survive a violent attack. (No one else has been arrested or charged in the incident.) Transgender women of color are at the highest risk of hate-based violence of any group, unsurprising for a group of people surviving under three oppressive yokes — racism, sexism, and transphobia — all at the same time. According to a 2011 report, 70 percent of LGBT murder victims were people of color. 44 percent were specifically women of color. [Full Article

CeCe McDonald, the Girl Who Lived (And Why There is No Justice for Transgender Women of Color)

fyqueerlatinxs:

Walking While Trans*: Law Enforecement & Trans* Latinas

“They are abusive, offensive and without respect.”

“They say they are going to protect us but they don’t. They treat us differently and call us crazy and say that we all have AIDS.”

“When they see us, they abuse their power.”

“They make fun of us and discriminate against us, especially if we are illegal.”

These are the words of several Latina trans* women in Los Angeles, from the recently published report, “Interactions of Latina Transgender Women with Law Enforcement.” The report was developed by BIENESTAR—a non-profit LGBTQ social service organization—and the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, funded by The Williams Institute.

The trans* community has a long and complex history with law enforcement. In the trans* community, we teach ourselves to look out for and take care of each other, because most of the time the police is not on our side. The words of these women and the statistics in this study show what most in the Latin@ trans* community already knew: “the data reveal a history of negative interactions with law enforcement on the part of a large number of Latina transgender women.”

Continue reading

[Submitted by kararikue]